Articles by Amy Lovett

The Significance of Place

Sensing Place Homepag Grid

By Julia Munemo Williams faculty members Henry Art and Mark Taylor are neighbors on the southern end of a hilly, rocky ridge that holds a special place in the heart of Williamstown. Stone Hill was named by mid-18th century European settlers who cleared the land for farms, and today much of it has reverted to

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The Story Behind Sharknado

sharknado Grid Archive

With the fourth installment of Syfy Channel’s Sharknado franchise out this summer, Thomas Vitale ’86, who developed and commissioned the first two Sharknado movies and worked at the Syfy and Chiller networks for more than 20 years before founding his own production company, discusses how a concept about man-eating sharks deposited on land via waterspouts led to a campy,

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Practical Theater

Summer Theatre Lab 1

In the CenterStage of the ’62 Center for Theatre and Dance, a student actor knelt down by a potted plant and feigns gardening. She turned to another student seated on a wooden stairwell leading to an open bedroom, part of the minimalist set creating the scene of this play. A third student stood far off

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Ilvermorny on Greylock

The next time clouds gather at the peak of Mount Greylock, hiding it from view of the residents below, there could be magic happening. At least in the world of J.K. Rowling. Through her website Pottermore.com, Rowling recently introduced Ilvermorny School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and announced that it’s located in North America on top

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A Marvelous Collaboration

By Julia Munemo The sold-out, March 12 “pre-premiere” of the opera A Marvelous Order at Williams’ ’62 Center for Theatre and Dance brings together the creative talents of three Williams alumni. Will Rawls ’00 is the choreographer, Judd Greenstein ’01 is the composer, and Joshua Frankel ’02 is the director and animator in a production

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Food and Farming in Vermont

By Natalie DiNenno ’18 Mari Omland ’89 stands among a cluster of sparkling, snow-covered trees, shaking a bucket of grain for the 12 goats trotting behind her. Out for some exercise, they’re distracted by the evergreens and adoring Williams students surrounding them. But Omland skillfully coaxes the animals back to the barn. It’s the students’

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From Navy SEAL to Student

When Jake Bingaman ’19 started college for the first time, in 2004, the U.S. had recently invaded Iraq. Although he wanted to earn a college degree—and had a scholarship from Miami University to do just that—Bingaman also felt a growing sense of commitment to his country. “We as a nation were doing something important, and

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Come Back to the Log

If the walls of the Log could talk, one can only imagine the tales they would tell. Within its friendly confines, generations of Williams students and alumni mingled over frosty beverages and snacks, blew off steam at the foosball table, celebrated homecoming victories or settled in for Monday Night Football. Friends were made and future

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Storm Waves and Coastal Erosion

After proving that storm waves crashing into Ireland’s Aran Islands were responsible for shifting extremely large rocks high above sea level and far inland, geosciences professor Ronadh Cox and her students are working to understand the long-term effects of coastal erosion. With a three-year, $277,509 grant from the National Science Foundation, Cox and her students will study the effects

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Geosciences Across the Curriculum

With a $10 million NSF grant, Cathryn Manduca ’80 is working to infuse undergraduate curricula with a better understanding of the planet.

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