Feature Stories

Students Take on Renewable Energy Projects

Several Williams students are working to help the college meet its commitment to reducing its carbon footprint by 35 percent of its 1990 levels by 2020. Two of the college’s Renewable Energy Interns spent the last year on a program that will deeply impact the town of Williamstown—a program the… Continue reading »

Four Alumni Awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

Robin Broad ’76 Four Williams alumni were awarded Guggenheim Fellowships this year: Robin Broad ’76, a professor at American University’s School of International Service; novelist Fiona Maazel ’97; poet and MacArthur fellow Claudia Rankine ’86; and choreographer Will Rawls ’00. The grants are made freely and with no conditions, allowing… Continue reading »

The Forests of Antarctica

The Forests of Antarctica, a new painting series by Williams Professor of Art Mike Glier ’75, depicts what he calls “a distant future, where the temperature is warm enough to support exuberant life in Antarctica, but it’s life we can’t quite recognize.” Glier, who has been teaching in the art… Continue reading »

Accession Number: 1960-62

The 290 objects in Accession Number, a new exhibition at the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), line the gallery walls in the order in which they were acquired by the museum between mid-January 1960 and mid-December 1962. They represent about three-quarters of the 396 objects acquired in those years. Continue reading »

‘The World to Come,‘ Stories by Jim Shepard

Reviews are coming in for Jim Shepard’s new book of short stories, The World to Come. A review in The Washington Post calls Shepard, who is the J. Leland Miller Professor of American History, Literature and Eloquence, “an outrageously versatile and gifted fiction writer who is deeply at home in a… Continue reading »

Age of Consequences

The new documentary Age of Consequences approaches climate change from a different angle than most films on the subject. “The U.S. military thinks about climate change as a threat multiplier and an accelerant to instability,” says the film’s executive producer, Sophie Robinson ’11. “Our film tells the story of climate… Continue reading »

Is This Los Angeles’ $600 Million Man?

Michael Govan ’85, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is featured in a New York Times article about “his provocative vision for his museum and his adopted city.” By ADAM NAGOURNEY JAN. 18, 2017 LOS ANGELES — Michael Govan stood in a third-floor gallery… Continue reading »

Microeconomics: From Billsville to the Beltway

By Julia Munemo What happens when someone steeped in economic research and theory spends some time in Washington D.C. developing policies? Associate Professor of Economics Tara Watson found out when she served as the deputy assistant secretary of microeconomics at the U.S. Department of the Treasury from August 2015 to… Continue reading »

Environmental Impact

In high school at St. Andrew’s in Delaware, Luke Baumann ’19 led a student task force in developing a proposal to install a small solar array on campus. They succeeded—researching the technology, meeting with contractors, presenting to the board of trustees, and securing funding through grants and donations—and the experience… Continue reading »

Welcome, Everyone, to Computer Science

By Julia Munemo It’s a play on words—or rather on acronyms. UnICS is the name of a student-led group, and it stands for Underrepresented Identities in Computer Science. The pun is that its homophone, UNIX, is an operating system some of those students have learned to master. “UnICS was created… Continue reading »