Feature Stories

This is the archive for Williams Feature Stories. If you’re looking for the archived Williams Home Page stories, please go here.

Nurturing Families

By Julia Munemo On any given day in associate professor of psychology Amie Hane’s Early Experience and Physiology lab, students are gathered around a TV monitor, reviewing video of mothers and tiny infants. They stop the recording every few seconds to take note of the slightest change in glance, touch, or tone of voice. Hane’s

Continue Reading →

ScienceBlast

By Julia Munemo Early on a recent spring morning, physics professor Tiku Majumder asked more than 70 Mount Greylock Regional High School students gathered in Wege Auditorium to consider a different view of science. “It’s easy for everyone to see that writing a novel or a piece of music is creative,” he told them. “What

Continue Reading →

Jim Shepard’s The Book of Aron

Professor Jim Shepard contributes to the conversation of the Holocaust in his new novel.

Continue Reading →

Prisoners’ Advocate

Melanie Velez ’95 champions the rights of those in America’s prisons and jails

Continue Reading →

Finding Home in Vietnam

By Julia Munemo Long Dang ’15 emigrated from Vietnam with his parents when he was 7 years old. The family settled in the Dorchester neighborhood in Boston, and Dang—in pursuit of an education beyond what had been available to his parents—immersed himself in the language and culture of his new country. Although he returned to

Continue Reading →

Challenging Police Brutality

By Julia Munemo Chaédria LaBouvier ’07 was working on her MFA in screenwriting at UCLA when her brother was shot and killed by a Dallas police officer in March 2013. It changed her life. She took a leave of absence from the program to focus instead on fighting police brutality. “We’re at a seismic shift

Continue Reading →

Checking out the Human Library

By Kirby Neuner ’15 We often roll our eyes at those who claim that a favorite work of art or book “speaks to them,” but last week at Williams, that cliché took on a vibrant reality. Students, faculty, and staff had the opportunity to participate in the Human Library, which was originally founded in Denmark

Continue Reading →

Encountering the Original

February marked the 500th anniversary of the death of Aldus Manutius, a man considered by many to be the grandfather of the liberal arts. A Venetian scholar, teacher, editor and publisher, Aldus was the first to publish Aristotle in the original Greek, and he had a hand in determining which texts the scholars and students

Continue Reading →

Lyric Citizen

Poet Claudia Rankine ’86 calls Americans to become “accountable to ourselves.”

Continue Reading →

Geoscience Across the Curriculum

With a $10 million NSF grant, Cathryn Manduca ’80 is working to infuse undergraduate curricula with a better understanding of the planet.

Continue Reading →