Articles by Amy Lovett

Food and Farming in Vermont

By Natalie DiNenno ’18 Mari Omland ’89 stands among a cluster of sparkling, snow-covered trees, shaking a bucket of grain for the 12 goats trotting behind her. Out for some exercise, they’re distracted by the evergreens and adoring Williams students surrounding them. But Omland skillfully coaxes the animals back to the barn. It’s the students’

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From Navy SEAL to Student

When Jake Bingaman ’19 started college for the first time, in 2004, the U.S. had recently invaded Iraq. Although he wanted to earn a college degree—and had a scholarship from Miami University to do just that—Bingaman also felt a growing sense of commitment to his country. “We as a nation were doing something important, and

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Come Back to the Log

If the walls of the Log could talk, one can only imagine the tales they would tell. Within its friendly confines, generations of Williams students and alumni mingled over frosty beverages and snacks, blew off steam at the foosball table, celebrated homecoming victories or settled in for Monday Night Football. Friends were made and future

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Storm Waves and Coastal Erosion

After proving that storm waves crashing into Ireland’s Aran Islands were responsible for shifting extremely large rocks high above sea level and far inland, geosciences professor Ronadh Cox and her students are working to understand the long-term effects of coastal erosion. With a three-year, $277,509 grant from the National Science Foundation, Cox and her students will study the effects

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Geosciences Across the Curriculum

With a $10 million NSF grant, Cathryn Manduca ’80 is working to infuse undergraduate curricula with a better understanding of the planet.

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Finding Her Voice

By Julia Munemo Acclaimed artist, poet, writer, and performer Mayda Del Valle ’00 returned to campus in June for a Reunion Weekend performance. Watching her on the MainStage of the ’62 Center for Theatre and Dance, it was hard to imagine that, just 15 years before, she’d been uncertain of her career path—and whether to

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Nurturing Families

By Julia Munemo On any given day in associate professor of psychology Amie Hane’s Early Experience and Physiology lab, students are gathered around a TV monitor, reviewing video of mothers and tiny infants. They stop the recording every few seconds to take note of the slightest change in glance, touch, or tone of voice. Hane’s

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ScienceBlast

By Julia Munemo Early on a recent spring morning, physics professor Tiku Majumder asked more than 70 Mount Greylock Regional High School students gathered in Wege Auditorium to consider a different view of science. “It’s easy for everyone to see that writing a novel or a piece of music is creative,” he told them. “What

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Finding Home in Vietnam

By Julia Munemo Long Dang ’15 emigrated from Vietnam with his parents when he was 7 years old. The family settled in the Dorchester neighborhood in Boston, and Dang—in pursuit of an education beyond what had been available to his parents—immersed himself in the language and culture of his new country. Although he returned to

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Challenging Police Brutality

By Julia Munemo Chaédria LaBouvier ’07 was working on her MFA in screenwriting at UCLA when her brother was shot and killed by a Dallas police officer in March 2013. It changed her life. She took a leave of absence from the program to focus instead on fighting police brutality. “We’re at a seismic shift

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